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Margaret Hamilton accepted her horrific on-screen appearance— replete with gangrenous skin, a jutting jaw, and a sharply hooked nose— having long ago made peace with her lack of physical beauty. “I’m glad I’m homely… My face has given me lots of work,” she confessed twenty- two years after playing the film’s heavy. With good humor, Hamilton recalled one instance of on-set  ribbing to Parade’s Karl Kohrs: “They put a sign on my chair, ‘Mag the Hag.’ Why, I just loved it. I’m not sensitive about my looks.” She stubbornly defended  her appearance from the time she was a little girl. Her father wanted to take her to a plastic surgeon to have her large nose altered, but she refused, saying “It was mine, and I wanted to keep it.” 

jackaldope:

liberals repurposing queerness so that it no longer undermines straightness but naturalizes it/affirms its legitimacy as a fundamentally contrasting way of being is the most incredible thing

(via monetizeyourcat)

AV Club: ["Same Love"] is definitely self-congratulatory.
Joe Mande: That’s the thing. You can tell just by his voice and how triumphantly he’s delivering the lyrics that he thinks he’s being so brave, but it’s like, “No. It’s 2014 and you’re a white dude with a Hitler-youth haircut.”
AV Club: From Seattle.
Joe Mande: And you’re from Seattle. I’m pretty sure everyone can tell you believe in gay marriage. I’d be more surprised if he made a song about how he loves gluten. Like how gluten deserves equal rights. I’d be like, “Yeah, that’s really brave of him. That’s so cool of a guy from Seattle to say something cool about gluten.”

We have always lived in slums and holes in the wall. We will know how to accommodate ourselves for a while. For you must not forget that we can also build. It is we who built these palaces and cities, here in Spain and America and everywhere. We, the workers. We can build others to take their place. And better ones. We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth; there is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts. That world is growing in this minute.

-Beunaventura Durruti

José Buenaventura Durruti Dumange (14 July 1896 – 20 November 1936) was an Anarcho-syndicalist militant involved with the CNT, FAI and other anarchist organisations during the period leading up to and including the Spanish Civil War. Durruti played an influential role during the Spanish revolution and is remembered as a hero in the Anarchist movement.

(via kropotkitten)

(via marxvx)